Knitter, web designer/developer, and I like the color yellow
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Rental Car

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Technically, both cars are haunted, but the murder ghosts can't stand listening to the broken GPS for more than a few minutes.
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fxer
65 days ago
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reticulating splines
Bend, Oregon
alt_text_bot
67 days ago
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Technically, both cars are haunted, but the murder ghosts can't stand listening to the broken GPS for more than a few minutes.

This Building Has Emoji Gargoyles, And They’re Brilliant

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Architecture is often perceived to be serious and reserved. But in Vathorst, a suburb about 30 miles southeast of Amsterdam, a new building takes a cheekier approach: It’s festooned with 22 emojis.

[Photo: Bart van Hoek/Attika Architekten]
Attika Architekten–a Dutch firm with offices in Amsterdam and Zutphen–designed a new mixed-use brick building and decided to punch up the design with a few choice flourishes–namely the most recognizable and understandable emoji (which happened to be faces, according to a report on the Verge).

“When we start with a project we always try to understand its context and anticipate on that matter,” architect Changiz Tehrani tells Co.Design. “We also try to add a little bit more detail in our architecture–it can be a decorative fence, a nice phrase, or the date of the [building’s completion]. In this case we wanted to add something contemporary, interesting, and recognizable on this particular facade.”

[Photo: Bart van Hoek/Attika Architekten]
To Tehrani and his team, emoji were the ideal embellishment. “Emoticons are the international language of now,” he says. “The world communicates with these iconic faces, and that is something special we think.”

Lest you write off these graphics as gimmicky or too silly, consider this: Gargoyles–those sculptures commonly found on historic buildings–feature monsters picking their noses, sucking their toes, expressing anguish, showing boredom, and more. Emoji are the perfect modern version of these figures, and undoubtedly make the building more fun.

So far the response seems to be positive. Tehrani has noticed students at the school next door taking photographs of the building. He says his clients were a bit hesitant about the idea, but trusted him to run with the idea. We’re glad they did, too.



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Designers Are Faxing Protest Art To Lawmakers (And So Can You)

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The Trump administration is poised to gut the National Endowment of the Arts, despite its already minuscule budget and tremendous (to reclaim the word) impact and scope. Resistance is underway, with organizers across the art world encouraging people to first and foremost speak to their lawmakers about the importance of the endowment.

Then there’s Artifax, an effort led by the Los Angeles design studio Use All Five, which is unearthing an unlikely protest tool: the fax machine. With a wink toward the Kafka-esque bureaucracy of local government offices, Artifax is encouraging people to fax pieces of artwork to elected officials to tell (and show) them why the arts matter. They’ll even provide the artwork: 20 artist and designer-commissioned works, including those by Pentagram, Open, and Isabel Urbina Peña, are available to use.

As with most messaging around budgets and statistics, the most effective are the ones that tell a numbers story. For example, fax your representative a reminder that National Endowment of the Arts and National Endowment of the Humanities represent just 0.02% of the overall budget:

Math by Open. [Screenshot: Artifax]
Or send a Natasha Jen-designed missive that compares Melania’s security expenses to the NEA’s yearly budget (which is less than half):

Pentagram. [Screenshot: Artifax]
Once you have selected your artwork, the site prompts you to enter your zip code to find your local representative—an incredibly helpful piece of design.

Importantly, Artifax also offers a message field so that you can add your own message. It offers a script but stresses that personalizing it is better. This is something that doesn’t always get emphasized with new apps and initiatives to make it easier to call representatives but is important to note. While the way that incoming messages are handled varies from one representative office to the next, most organizers will tell you that it’s always more impactful if you can make a persuasive and personal argument—one that both speaks to specific issues and shows how it effects you, the constituent. Messages that are received en masse—whether a scripted voicemail or a printed image—can make it easier to dismiss or group into one initiative (“Oh, these are the 350.org people again”) rather than carrying individual weight.

There is one caveat to this worth noting, which is that most fax machines these days are automated to forward to a designated inbox in the form of an email. Your representative will likely receive this piece of artwork in the form of an email, not a physical printout. This undercuts the assertion on Artifax’s website that faxes “still have that material impact that commands attention; they’re physical, and inconveniencing, and that’s what it takes to convey an impactful message to your representatives.” But an image still demands attention to an extent, and using actual pieces of art to convey why funding that directly supports the country’s artists and institutions is certainly a nice touch. The medium is the message.

Faxing representatives alone won’t save the NEA, of course, but that’s also not what Artifax is proposing. This is a clever approach to voicing protest to the budget, and one that emphasizes the subject through original artwork, as well as the outmoded technology still accessible to elected officials. Initiatives to get people to participate in democracy are worthwhile, and designer-led efforts that deal with systems of local government are rare and great to see.

We also like to think that our lawmakers can appreciate—if not totally enjoy—the cleverness of using an outmoded technology to get through an entrenched bureaucratic system. (Except for the interns on the email front lines. The interns will definitely hate it.)



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Pentagram’s Latest: A Construction Wall That’s Actually Beautiful

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The Philadelphia Museum of Art–you know its famous steps from Rocky’s exercise regimen–is currently in the middle of a $525 million transformation anchored by a new Frank Gehry-designed wing, with construction finally breaking ground on March 30. But visitors to the museum don’t have to wait until the wing’s completion date of 2020 to see something new: Pentagram designed a 450-foot fence that’ll display pieces from its collection for the duration of the build-out.

Construction infrastructure–like walls and scaffolding–is a necessary eyesore. And considering that the museum’s construction wall is, in total, longer than a football field, it could have been pretty ugly without some window dressing. But thanks to Paula Scher and her team at Pentagram, this wall is actually beautiful. About five years ago, Pentagram was hired to create signage for the expansion, which eventually morphed into a larger rebranding project for the museum. After completing the new identity for the museum, they stayed on to consult about special projects. One question that came up was what to do with the huge wall that had to go up around the construction site.

Pentagram’s solution? Turn it into an outdoor gallery. The wall features reproductions of 75 works of art from the museum’s collection. For the next three years, you’ll be able to spy pieces from Barbara Kruger, Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Chuck Close, and more, without even going into the museum.

The physical wall itself is unfinished plywood, which is a nod to the crates that fine art is normally packaged in for transportation. Pentagram stenciled the museum’s new logo onto the wood, as well as some of the icons and phrases associated with shipping, like “must lay flat,” and broken glasses to symbolize fragile contents. The pieces are all different sizes, they lean against the wall like actual, three-dimensional canvases waiting to be hung.

“Our goal with the identity design and our ongoing relationship with the Philadelphia Museum of Art has been, and continues to be, to open up the collection to the public,” Scher says. “The construction barricades are going up for three-plus years for the various renovation phases. The museum’s neoclassical architecture and lofty position on a hilltop makes it appear somewhat remote, and the construction barricades won’t help the museum seem accessible.”

The museum plans to rotate the artworks at least twice while the fence is up, hopefully enticing people to come inside. “I hope the passersby discover what a spectacular collection is housed in this wonderful museum and that they are motivated to give it a visit,” Scher says. “I am sure that some of the visitors to the construction wall may be viewing the collection for the first time.”

This is one wall that earns our seal of approval.



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Golf: 25 hours. Foreign relations: 21 hours

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Donald Trump regularly assailed President Barack Obama for playing golf, then spent the first weekends of his own presidency doing just that. He attacked Obama for using Air Force One to campaign, and did it over the weekend just a month into the job. He mocked Obama for heading out of Washington at taxpayer expense, but appears to have no qualms about doing so himself...
"Donald Trump has zero worry about contradicting himself, because he does it all day long," said Douglas Brinkley, a presidential historian who has met with Trump. "He figures he can get away with it because he does it all the time. There is no worry about it. He says one thing and then does another, and his supporters don't hold it against him.
"Trump said last August that if he became president, he wouldn’t have time for golf. "I'm going to be working for you, I'm not going to have time to go play golf," he said at an event in Virginia.
Text from Politico.  Infographic via Elle.
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The official org chart of the US government

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The United States Government Manual is the official handbook of the US federal government. Here is the org chart for our government…take notice of what’s right at the top:

US Govt Org Chart

I’m no constitutional scholar, but that particular document starts off:

We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

I realize the current executive administration doesn’t care and the current majority in the legislative branch barely cares, but remembering exactly who our government works for will be helpful over the next few years. (via @monstro)

Tags: politics   USA
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austinstorm
177 days ago
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Again, hate Trump. But kottke might've posted this during Obama's "I've got a pen and a phone" moment.
Moscow, Idaho
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